Stocking Stuffers and gifts for Gun Tinkerers

Tis the Season!  Here are some thoughts of things that are helpful for anyone who owns a pistol.  None of these are Lakeline products, but they are the really useful things, tools mainly, that help any pistol person maintain and work on their pistol.  All of these things I use and they make me happy every time I use them.  They are in order from lowest cost up.

  • Needle Files.  I use these all the time, and they cost less than $5!  Most of the time I use this needle file set, which costs less than $3.  If you want to step it up a bit, this needle file set has handles that make them nicer to hold on too and still only costs $6.99.  I usually buy the cheap ones and litter them about the places I work like reading glasses.
  • Gunsmith screwdriver set.  Working on your pistol with the rounded off screwdrivers that are used for prying things off the car, demolishing for a remodel, etc. just isn’t a great thing.  Worn screwdrivers round out the special screws in pistols, making them difficult to get apart and they are just unsightly. I like a set that all fits in a case and gets stored with the guns, not out in the garage where they will be used and abused like the other screwdrivers.  Being “thrifty” I find specialty gunsmith sets pretty expensive for what they have.  I like a set that all fits in a case and gets stored with the guns, not out in the garage where they will be used and abused like the other screwdrivers.  But, this nice $20 set has most everything needed and is reasonably priced: Aosky Professional Precision Magnetic Screwdriver Sets
  • Punch Set.  Pistols have lots of little pins that are used to hold them together.  To get them in and out, and to help persuade other stuck parts to move, the proper tool is a punch set.  Brass punches are nice because they are softer than the steel in the pistol and usually won’t damage important parts.  A good starter punch set can be had for under $30:

    Wheeler Engineering Hammer and Punch Set with Brass, Steel, Plastic Punches

  • Torque Screwdriver.  If you work with scopes and sights, a torque screwdriver is a necessity.  Most sight work uses torques in the 6 to 30 inch pounds range.  Some pistol sights, like many of the screw on pistol sights, need an even lower range, like 1 to 5 inch pounds.  That gets more expensive, but a good tool for the low torque requirements is:

    Capri Tools Ultra Precision Certified Torque Limiting Screwdriver Set

    For the more typical scope rings on rifles, etc. a reasonably priced choice for under $50 with a 10 to 50 inch pound range is: Adjustable Gun Torque Screwdriver 1/4″ inch Drive Long Shank 10-50 in/lb with 14pcs Bits Set

  • Sight tool or Sight Pusher.  If you like your pistols, at some point you are going to change sights on them, or adjust them.  Without a good sight tool, it is easy to scratch or ding up the slide or sights, or break the tritium vials in night sights.  I own most of the cheaper sight tools, but still went ahead and bought this one when I was frustrated trying to use the ones that flex, bend, and scratch up my pistols.  Save some money and buy the good one up front, it is under $200:  Wheeler Engineering Armorer’s Front and Rear Handgun Sight Tool
    Merry Christmas and happy gun tinkering from the gang at Lakeline LLC!!

The Sig P365 Metal Followers Run and Run!

The P365 followers look great, and keep looking great with use.  The harder material and shape of the follower prevent gouging and the finish looks great even after use.  Here are some photos of a follower with over 300 rounds run through it this outing and it still looks like new.

First, as removed from the magazine after shooting, it will have brass smeared on it:

Here is another shot:

The brass and dirt wipe right off with a gun cleaner.  The follower still looks like new.  There is a little bit of finish wear where the slide stop contacts it, right on the edge of the ledge that can be seen below:

The pistol runs fine, slow or fast, and it is consistent locking back after the last round.  These add a very high quality feel and look to the magazines.

Fall at Lakeline LLC

So far we’ve been having a beautiful, if sometimes cool, fall.

Besides enjoying some of the local events, like Mahogany and Merlot (pictured above), we’ve been working on products.

The metal followers for the Sig Sauer P365 are available.  These don’t gouge and provide consistent, smooth feeding and solid slide lock engagement (after the last round is fired).

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We have new products for the Taurus G2 series pistols coming out in the next couple of weeks as well as a product for the Ruger Security 9.  Our fiber optic sights for the Taurus TH9 and TH9c should also be available in that time.

Enjoy your fall.  Get out and do some shooting while there is still some great weather for it.

 

Independence Day

I am one of the Americans who actually knows which country we won our independence from in the 1700s as well as many other facts of our country’s history. I appreciate our country and those who sacrificed for it and continue to protect it to this day.  It is what it is.

Still, I work with people who toil mightily to gain their independence to do the things the rest of consider normal every day and I appreciate our customers who help us help them to achieve more independence than most people think possible.  It is a different perspective on Independence Day that is much more personal than the holiday meaning of it yet I can’t help but think about it even more so on the 4th of July.

So, thanks to you all and I wish you a happy Independence Day.  We sure appreciate all of it.

SALE on G10 Grips for the Sig Sauer P226

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Sig Sauer P226 G10 Grips

All of our in-stock G10 grips for the Sig Sauer P226 are marked down from $84.99 to $69.99.

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Sig Sauer P226 G10 Grips

Check it out:

https://lakelinellc.com/product-category/sig-sauer-pistol-parts-and-accessories/sig-sauer-grips/

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Sig Sauer P226 G10 Grips

Time Flies!

I see I haven’t posted in awhile.  That is mostly because I have been posting more on our Lakeline LLC Facebook page.

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This week I’ve been working more with our trigger springs for the Taurus Spectrum.  We have 10% and 20% reduced power springs which lighten the pull weight on the trigger.  Since the spring is held in with a custom rivet, I will have to get the rivets in stock to go with the springs before we get those on the market.  The photo above has the 20% reduced power spring on the right, and the factory spring on the left.

We will have parts out for the Sig Sauer P365 soon as well.  I’ve been busy testing and working on the first few of those as well.  Thanks!

 

Latest Products, Taurus Striker Guide and Firing Pin Springs

In the last couple of weeks we have introduced a couple of new products for the Taurus PT111 G2, PT140 G2, 709 and 740.

First, our Stainless Steel Striker (firing pin) guide locks out the Taurus Security System lock and smooths the trigger feel by not having the firing pin bump over the hole in the factory striker guide and it locates the firing pin more precisely for a crisper feel.

G2 Striker Guide Top

And, since little springs sometimes wear out or go flying when working on pistols, we have the Firing Pin and Firing Pin Return springs available for those same pistols as well.

Firing Pin Spring and Return Spring for Taurus PT111 G2, PT 140 G2, 709 and 740

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Get the Grit (gritty feeling) out of your Taurus PT111 G2, PT140 G2, 709 or 740 Trigger

I have three Taurus pistols with the trigger system used in the PT111 G2, 2 PT111 G2s and a PT140 G2.  The first one I purchased has thousands of rounds through it and the trigger is very smooth with a pull weight in either single action or double action of just over 4 lbs on average.  The second pistol has I would guess about a thousand rounds through it, and the third is brand new (PT140 G2).

The trigger on the PT140 G2, and to a lesser extent, the second PT111 G2 have a gritty feel, particularly in the last bit of their travel before they release the striker.  I went on a mission last week to see what I could do quickly and easily (no major disassembly and a process that could be done in 15 minutes or so).  Sure, I know I could completely strip the frame, polish all the bits that rub, and have a trigger every bit as good as the oldest one on all three triggers.  But, I also know most folks don’t like to do that and I wanted to see if I could find an easy way to get at least part of the benefit of a stoning and polish job.  Or, if I could avoid having to expend a thousand plus rounds to get a smooth trigger, so much the better.

The first thing I did was remove the slide from the pistol.  I found the striker moves in the slide without any of the gritty feeling and was pretty consistent across all three pistols, so I set the slides aside.

Next, I worked the triggers on all three pistols, paying particular attention to what was moving when they felt gritty.  Time for a photo:

What I found is that on the last little bit of trigger movement, when the part marked with a blue arrow above moves, the trigger felt gritty.

I also looked at the well worn in pistol, and its trigger bar looked polished for nearly a half inch towards the muzzle from the disconnector.

The trigger bar can be moved around with a finger.  The new pistols felt very gritty as it was moved both up and down and back and forth.

To cut to the chase, I also found I could get most of the benefit of the polish job by applying a lube (in this case a grease, like Tetra gun grease) in the areas in the first photo shown above.  It takes a toothpick, to work it all along the top and sides of the trigger bar while holding it down below the disconnector.   I applied it liberally and worked it in.  Then, I took a cotton swab and cleaned out the excess.

The two newer triggers are almost as smooth as the old trigger with that done.  Since the springs are still a bit stiffer, the pull weight is still a little higher on the new ones even after lubricating the trigger bar.  I had sprayed CLP and Rem oil on the trigger bar area with no improvement.  I also cleaned out the trigger bar and the rear mechanisms as best as I could with GunScrubber before lubricating it again.  A lubricant like motor oil, manual transmission fluid, etc may work as well.  I think it takes something with more film strength than CLP or Rem oil.

If you have a gritty trigger, give this a try and comment on whether it helped or not.  I would love to hear if this works for others.  And, have fun shooting those Taurus pistols!